David Campbell

Born and raised in Alberta, Canada, David earned a B.A. in political science from Brigham Young University, and is now a PhD candidate in the same subject at Harvard University. While at Harvard, his research has explored numerous aspects of American politics. These include how different types of religious institutions can, under certain circumstances, both encourage and discourage political participation; the increasing link between religion and Republican party identification among younger voters; how service learning can potentially contribute to social capital; and a comparison of the civic education provided by public and private secondary schools. David has an interest in education policy and has collaborated in research using randomized field trials to evaluate the effects of school vouchers. He and Paul Peterson have edited a book on vouchers and charter schools that will be published by the Brookings Institution Press in summer 2001.

David’s dissertation proposes a new theory to understand different motivations for political and civic (that is, non-political) activity. He hypothesizes that civic norms are inculcated in adolescence and persist over one’s lifetime, whereas political participation is facilitated by shorter-term factors.

More importantly, David and his wife Kirsten are the parents of two children, Katie (age 5) and Soren (age 2).